Tutorial Content Standards

Table of Contents

Tutorial Content Standards

Formatting

Quick Start Guide

Overview

Our tutorials are written by experienced educators, all of whom also offer private tutoring lessons. These tutorials help students get the help they need, either directly or by suggesting local and online tutors.

Tutorials can be written for a variety of academic subjects, including math, science, English, and test prep. As a tutor on our site, writing tutorials is a great way to demonstrate your subject matter expertise to prospective students. Tutorials you’ve authored will be displayed in your profile and will improve your search ranking.

Tutorial Components

Each tutorial presents a sample problem representative of a common problem type, plus a corresponding solution. Each tutorial will contain the following components.

  • Subject – The list of available tutorial subjects is the same as the list of available tutoring subjects.
  • Title – The title briefly describes the specific problem type you are discussing in your tutorial. It’s not necessary to include the subject or the word “tutorial” in your title.
  • Intro – The intro is a block of text, images, videos, HTML, and/or LaTeX that familiarizes the reader with the problem type you are giving instruction on.
  • Sample Problem – Each tutorial will include a sample problem that epitomizes the problem type.
    • Problem Statement – The problem statement contains the question along with any information necessary to solve the problem. Accepts text, images, videos, HTML, and LaTeX.
    • Source URL – The source URL is the URL of the problem source. Leave the field blank if the question is original.
    • Passage – (Optional) The passage is a block of supplementary text, images, or videos that are needed to solve the problem. Accepts text, images, videos, HTML, and LaTeX.
    • Answer Choices – (Optional) If you wish to make your tutorial interactive, include a correct answer and at least one distractor answer. Accepts text, images, videos, HTML, and LaTeX.
  • Solution – The solution is the meat of your tutorial. It is a step-by-step solution to the sample problem. A minimum of 200 words is recommended. Accepts text, images, videos, HTML, and LaTeX.

Formatting

The main sections of a tutorial (intro, problem statement, and solution) accept text, images, videos, HTML, and LaTeX. Basic, unformatted text can be entered if you have no knowledge of HTML. HTML can be entered to achieve custom formatting, to insert links and images, and to embed videos. LaTeX can also be entered for mathematics formulas and graphics.

For detailed instructions, follow the links below.

Images

Videos

HTML

CSS

LaTeX

Submission

Before submitting a tutorial for approval, you may preview its appearance to ensure it looks, feels, and functions as intended. Once submitted for approval, we will review it as soon as possible, usually within a few days. If no or only minor changes are needed, we will publish the tutorial immediately. If substantial changes are required to meet our content standards, we will write to you requesting that you make the changes and resubmit. Once your tutorial is published, you may make changes at any time. All changes will be reviewed before going live.

Overview

Purpose

The purpose of these tutorial content standards is to help you author the highest quality tutorials. Use this document to learn what is expected for each tutorial component and how to use the authoring tool.

Company Objective

The Knowledge Roundtable’s mission is to make knowledge accessible to everyone. The tutorials you will be authoring help fulfill this mission by providing students with free educational content and by making more students aware that private tutors are available to help.

Setting the Standard

This is a living document; it is continuously being improved thanks to feedback from tutors like you.

Is the way you have approached authoring tutorials better than what’s outlined in this document? Good! Help set the new standard by contributing. To contribute, start by adding a comment below. We will contact you to discuss and/or simply add your contribution to the document.

Formatting

Images

To insert an image, you must use HTML. An example and tutorial are provided below.

<img src="smiley.gif" alt="Smiley face" height="42" width="42">

<img> Tutorial

If you need to upload an image from your computer, please use a service such as imgur.com, then insert the image’s url in the “src” attribute of the <img> tag.

Videos

To insert a video from YouTube, follow the instructions below. A similar process applies for other video hosting serves such as Vimeo.

  1. Go to YouTube and find the video (or create your own).
  2. Click the Share link under the video.
  3. Click the Embed link.
  4. Copy the code provided in the expanded box.
  5. Paste the code into one of the intro, problem statement, passage, or solution sections of your tutorial.

HTML

All tutorial sections (except the title) accept HTML. Some basic HTML tags are provided in the toolbars above each section. For additional information on common HTML elements, follow the links below.

HTML Tutorials

Creating Lists

Creating Tables

CSS

Inline styles are accepted for any HTML element. Add a “style” attribute to any HTML tag, then add custom styling with CSS. An example and tutorial are below.

<p style=”color:red;padding:7px;”>Hello World!</p>

CSS Tutorials

LaTeX

LaTeX is supported in all tutorial sections except the title, made possible by the QuickLaTeX WordPress Plugin. For documentation and examples, follow the link below.

QuickLaTeX Documentation
Math in LaTeX Documentation

Please note that each tutorial section is automatically prepended with [latexpage]. This means that 1) you can enter LaTeX in any section with standard LaTeX syntax and 2) each section must be treated as a separate LaTeX document.


Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

^