Using Coordinating Conjunctions and Compound Sentances

Grammar Tutorial

Using Coordinating Conjunctions and Compound Sentances

Intro

In this tutorial, we will learn how to use coordinating conjunctions, also known as FANBOYS, to combine two complete sentances into a compound sentance.

Sample Problem

Use a coordinating conjunction to combine these two sentences to form a compound sentence. Marsha will go to the mall. Thomas will not go to the mall.

Solution

Step One: What is a coordinating conjunction?

A coordinating conjunction is used to combine two sentances to form what is known as a compound sentence. To remember what these words are, we call them FANBOYS. Why? Because the first letter of each word, when put in order, spells FANBOYS.

The following are coordinating conjunctions:

  • For
  • And
  • Nor
  • But
  • Or
  • Yet
  • So

Step Two: What is a compound sentence?

A compound sentence is two sentences combined by a comma and a coordinating conjunction. The basic structure of a compound sentence looks like:

sentence + , + coordinating conjunction + sentence.

It is important to always remember your comma when writing a compound sentence. Without the comma, your sentence becomes a run-on sentence.

Step Three: Writing a compound sentence.

The question asks us to combine “Martha will go to the mall” and “Thomas will go to the park” into one compound sentence. To do this, we use the sentence structure above to make these two sentences into a compound sentence.

Martha will go to the park + , + coordinating conjunction + Thomas will go to the park.

Step Four: Choosing the right coordinating conjunction

When writing a compound sentence, we cannot just simply throw one of the coordinating conjunctions after the comma and call it a correct compound sentence. Yes, it will be a compound sentence, but will it have the same meaning as the two sentences that make it up?

For example: Martha will go to the mall, so Thomas will not go to the mall. Does not have the same meaning as the original two sentences. Neither sentence says why Thomas will not go to the mall; however, the sentence above suggests that it is because Martha is going to the mall.

In this case, the coordinating conjunction but is the best choice.

Martha will go to the mall, but Thomas will not go to the mall.

OPTIONAL: You can remove words from the end of your second sentence if you wish, as long as the compound sentence has the same meaning as the original two sentences and as long as both halves are complete sentences.

Martha will go to the mall, but Thomas will not go to the mall. –>
Martha will go to the mall, but Thomas will not.



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