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San Y

Cambridge, ON, Canada

Math And Science

$50/hr

Profile

I have a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering specialized in process optimization. In my full-time job, I have been applying mathematical techniques to solving engineering problems in oil industry for more than 10 years. I know very well what level of understanding students should have in mathematics and science to become successful in their future study and career.

At home, I have been reviewing Singapore math and science textbooks and teaching Singapore curriculum to my kids. I have a strong belief that well-written textbooks and a rigorous curriculum can develop students fundamental understanding of math and science. Besides, I have been developing education iOS apps. Some of my apps are available for download from App Store.

Education

Ph.D. Chemical Engineering

Subjects of Expertise

Pre-Algebra, Algebra 1, Algebra 2, Geometry, Trigonometry, Calculus, Statistics, Chemistry, Physics, Physical Science, Pre-Calculus, Elementary Math (K-6th), Elementary Science (K-6th)

7 Tutorials by San Y

Motion of objects under gravity

Have you wondered why an apple hits the ground when it falls from a tree but why the moon does not hit the earth? In this tutorial, we will look at different types of motion under gravity.

Algebraic Evaluation of Limits

We are going to use a simple example to explain key concepts in limit.

Common Denominator in Fraction Addition and Subtraction

In this tutorial, we will use a simple example to illustrate the concept of common denominator in fraction addition/subtraction.

Principle of Air Conditioning

In this tutorial, we will look at how we can transfer heat from a low temperature region to a high temperature region.

L’Hospital Rule

Is indeterminate form the only condition we need to check before using L’Hospital Rule?

Reason for Order of Operations – Part 2

In this tutorial, we will look at a simple mixed addition and multiplication to illustrate the reason for order of operations from unit perspective.

Reason for Order of Operations – Part 1

In this tutorial, we will use a simple mixed addition and multiplication example to illustrate the reason for order of operations

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