Why It’s Necessary To Finish The School Year Strong

why finish strong

Why It’s Necessary To Finish The School Year Strong

As a parent you are probably well aware of the fact that as the days get longer and the humidity rises your teens desire to tackle their remaining academic responsibilities takes a distinct nose dive.

You might also be ready to throw in the towel on trying to get your kids to hunker down and finish their assignments. Trust me, we here at Knowledge Roundtable understand your plight because we are facing the same thing, but after reading this article by Justin Tarte we feel it’s important to outline why finishing the year strong is important.

Some of the reasons why it is necessary to be the stern parent and get your child to buckle down these last few weeks include:

  • Each day and lesson builds on one another
  • Accomplishments can still be undone
  • There are a finite number of days in school, so make them count

Each lesson = Building Blocks

Anyone who has ever spent a week in school can attest to the fact that each lesson builds upon one another. For example, in math we learn how to add and subtract before we learn long division because the principles which allow us to add and subtract are the same principles that will guide us though the long division process.

It’s important that students pay attention and put effort into trying to learn the concepts taught at the end of the school year because teachers next fall will expect them to have mastered them.

Benefits of putting effort in at the end:

  • School assigned summer work may touch on such concepts so they’ll need to have working knowledge of them in order to complete their work.
  • It’s easy to fall behind in the fall if you have failed to master concepts taught at the end of the previous year

Accomplishments can be Undone

It’d be a shame for your child, who has tirelessly worked all year long racking up A’s and B’s to lose all those academic achievements because they wanted to stay outside in favor of studying in the final weeks. What many students are unaware of is that midterms and final-related projects are routinely worth a higher percentage of their final grade than the smaller assignments and class participation categories which rack up gradually over the course of the year.

Make sure any summertime sadness comes from not getting that second ice cream cone from the ice cream truck and not from grades!

Finite Number of Days

Just like there are a finite number of points up for grabs when determining your child’s final grades, there are also a finite number of days within a school year. Your child may complain about how “this year is just dragging on mommm!” but in the US, children only spend 180 days per year in a school setting. Basically, kids are only in school for ¾ of the year—much less than kids overseas. Because of this, it’s important to maximize every learning opportunity and not take a single second for granted.

Another great reason you should be on your kid to tackle their projects with the same vigor on day 180 as on day 1 is because working hard at a constant clip creates learning muscle memory within a student’s body.

Looking Ahead

Now that you know why it’s necessary to have a wall to wall finish, make sure you check back on June 3rd for tips on how to finish the school year strong. Also, make sure to use the social buttons at the bottom of this article to share with friends!


About Shannon Hutchins

Hey! Shannon is a customer service representative, a social media team member and blogger for The Knowledge Roundtable. Shannon came to the company late in 2014 and holds a BA in Media Studies from Colby-Sawyer College. While Shannon was completing her degree she wrote for, and eventually became editor of her collegiate newspaper, The Courier. For The Courier she mainly wrote about breaking college news as well as about local sports teams. She is a former tutor herself who believes in the advancement of knowledge for all and is studying to take the LSAT’s in hopes of going on and obtaining her JD.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

^